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Chris Sherman – Search Engine Land News On Search Engines, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Search Engine Marketing (SEM) Thu, 23 May 2019 14:41:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 The new realities of local search /the-new-realities-of-local-search-317364 Tue, 21 May 2019 14:29:29 +0000 /?p=317364 How does Google's local algorithm really work? What are the factors that impact your results and how do you optimize for success? It's more imperative than ever to learn which tactics really matter.

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The concept of “local search” has always been somewhat ambiguous in terms of how it’s defined, how it functions and who uses it. Broadly speaking, local search helps users locate nearby services or retailers based on physical location. Over the years, local search has improved with the widespread adoption of mobile devices and the ever-increasing accuracy of geolocation services.

But the lines have always been blurred. For example, does the local branch or store of a national or international corporation count as a “local” provider? And now, with the advent of one-day or even same-day delivery by giants like Amazon or WalMart, is “local” even a meaningful differentiator at all?

These and other issues are the subject of The Evolving Landscape Of Local Search panel, taking place at SMX Advanced on Wednesday, June 5 in Seattle. In this session, you’ll learn that traditional SEO techniques are still integral for reaching locally targeted audiences, but other factors are now also playing a significant role in success. You’ll learn how to improve your results by focusing on reviews, questions and answers, knowledge panel management and other organic tactics.

“The biggest challenge facing Local SEOs these days is the changing Local SERPs,” said Andrew Shotland, one of the speakers on the panel. “Google keeps putting ads and Google-owned properties all over them making it tricky for SEOs. And as Google keeps adding new features to Google My Business (e.g. GMB posts) prioritization of work has become trickier as we need to continually test what’s worth investing in for clients.”

You’ll also need to keep an eye on new options for local advertising: Product listing and map ads, location extensions, local inventory ads — the list goes on.

And last but not least, you’ll learn how to combat spam, the bane of all SEOs. This is especially important when competitors have managed to optimize spammy content to outperform your own listings and locations. “Local spam has become more and more prolific,” said Conrad Saam, another speaker on the panel. “Previously it was in the realm of locksmiths and plumbers, but it is now invading Main street across America in various different industries. We plan to demonstrate the various techniques that local spammers use so you can spot fake offices and have them removed from the map.”

If you’re responsible for local SEO, you won’t want to miss this crucial session at SMX Advanced. Check out the full SMX Advanced agenda and register now.

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AMP user experience updates include video, lists, more /amp-user-experience-updates-include-video-lists-more-313238 Fri, 01 Mar 2019 14:54:54 +0000 /?p=313238 The Accelerated Mobile Projects has rolled out a number of new capabilities so far this year.

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Google announced the AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) project to improve the user experience on mobile devices in 2015. Since then, the web publishing framework has advanced significantly to support a large array of on-page elements and options including support for ads, analytics, interactive elements, dynamic geo-targeting and more. This week, the team released an overview of the updates that have rolled out since January.

Video improvements

Minimize video. You can now set a video to minimize to the corner of the viewport when a user scrolls. This is useful in cases where it’s important to allow a user to read text at the same time a video is playing, for example, while following the instructions in a recipe.

Include video ads. The component now provides an easy way for publishers to monetize video by including ads from any video ad network.

User interface improvements

Resize lists. Developers can now specify when they want a container to resize when a user interacts with content.

Infinite scroll. When the user reaches the end of a list of items (search results, product cards, etc), the list can now be populated with more items.

Input masking in forms. Input masking allows developers to build in enhancements that makes it easier for a user to fill out forms. For example, automatically putting spaces in place when a user fills out a date or credit card or phone number.

Better transitions in lightbox mode. Lightbox mode allows a user to expand a component to fill the viewport, until it is closed again by the user. Until recently this has been technically challenging; the new improvements make it easier for developers to use lightbox mode with various types of images.

Other improvements

  • AMP now allows Consent Management Platforms to easily integrate with AMP, and allows publishers to show their own consent UI inside AMP.
  • Publishers can now display localized dates for users, so users can see publishing dates for an article in their local time.
  • AMP Stories now allow publishers to enhance a Google ad request with additional targeting information.

Why you should care. AMP continues to gain functionality. That doesn’t mean there isn’t still skepticism and hesitation to adopt the Google-backed protocol given there are still limitations, but the regular addition of new features means they should at least keep it on their radar. The AMP team said it will be publishing an overview soon on what’s new in the AMP Stories format, including support for links, a hamburger menu, hold to pause, a new desktop UI, and attachments.

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Want to speak at SMX Advanced? Here’s how /want-to-speak-at-smx-advanced-heres-how-2-312554 Tue, 19 Feb 2019 21:17:09 +0000 /?p=312554 The agenda for our upcoming SMX Advanced show is live and we've opened up our speaking pitch form for select sessions of the show.

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Joe Martinez speaks at SMX West 2019

We’re looking for speakers for our SMX Advanced conference, taking place June 4-5 at the Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle this year.

To increase the odds of being selected, be sure to read the agenda. Understand what the sessions are about. Ensure that your pitch is on target to the show’s audience and the session. Please also be very specific about what you intend to cover. Also, if you do not see a particular session listed, this is because there are no openings for that session. Use this form to submit your request.

PLEASE NOTE: Many sessions have already been filled and are not open for pitches. If a session does not appear on the pitch form, it is closed, even if no speakers are appearing on the agenda yet.

As you might guess, interest is high in speaking at Marketing Land conferences. We literally sift through hundreds of submissions to select speakers for the show. Here are some tips that will increase your chances of being selected.

Pitch early: Submitting your pitch early gives you a better chance of being selected. Coordinators accept speakers as soon as they identify a pitch that they think best fits the session, just like colleges that use a rolling admissions policy. So pitching early increases the likelihood you’ll be chosen.

Use the form: The speaker pitch form (http://marketinglandevents.com/speaker-form/) is the way to ask to speak. There’s helpful information there about how your pitch should be written and what it should contain.

Write it yourself and be specific: Lots of pitches come in that are not specific to the session. This is the most effective way to ensure that your pitch is ignored. And this year, we’re no longer accepting pitches written by anyone other than a proposed speaker. If you’re a thought leader, write the pitch yourself… and make certain that it is 100% focused on the session topic.

“Throw your best pitch:” We’re limiting the number of pitches to three per person, so please pitch for the session(s) where you really feel you’ll offer SMX attendees your best.

NEW: SMX Insights Sessions. We’re premiering SMX Insights sessions at SMX Advanced. What are they? 8-12 minute solo sessions that pack a punch and wow attendees with content they can’t and won’t see anywhere else. Tactical. Specific. Actionable. Speakers are challenged to deliver the goods in a limited amount of time: one must-try tactic, one nugget of sage advice, or one takeaway that makes you more productive. Have a gem to share with your colleagues? Pitch your idea and you may make it to the SMX stage!

You’ll be notified: Everyone who pitches to speak will be notified by email whether you are accepted or not.

And don’t delay — the pitch forms for each session will close as sessions are filled, with everything closing Friday, March 15.

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Want to speak at SMX London? Here’s how /want-to-speak-at-smx-london-heres-how-311079 Mon, 28 Jan 2019 06:00:43 +0000 /?p=311079 SMX London takes place on May 21-22 at 155 Bishopsgate, Liverpool St., London EC2M 3YD. To increase the odds of being selected to speak, be sure to read the agenda. Understand what the sessions are about. Ensure that your pitch is on target to the show’s audience and the session. Please also be very specific […]

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SMX London takes place on May 21-22 at 155 Bishopsgate, Liverpool St., London EC2M 3YD. To increase the odds of being selected to speak, be sure to read the agenda. Understand what the sessions are about. Ensure that your pitch is on target to the show’s audience and the session. Please also be very specific about what you intend to cover. Also, if you do not see a particular session listed, this is because there are no openings for that session. Use this form to submit your request.

PLEASE NOTE: Many sessions have already been filled and are not open for pitches. If a session does not appear on the pitch form, it is closed, even if no speakers are appearing on the agenda yet.

As you might guess, interest is high in speaking at Marketing Land conferences. We literally sift through hundreds of submissions to select speakers for the show. Here are some tips that will increase your chances of being selected.

Pitch early: Submitting your pitch early gives you a better chance of being selected. Coordinators accept speakers as soon as they identify a pitch that they think best fits the session, just like colleges that use a rolling admissions policy. So pitching early increases the likelihood you’ll be chosen.

Use the form: The speaker pitch form (http://marketinglandevents.com/speaker-form/) is the way to ask to speak. There’s helpful information there about how your pitch should be written and what it should contain.

Write it yourself and be specific: Lots of pitches come in that are not specific to the session. This is the most effective ways to ensure that your pitch is ignored. And this year, we’re no longer accepting pitches written by anyone other than a proposed speaker. If you’re a thought leader, write the pitch yourself… and make certain that it is 100% focused on the session topic.

“Throw your best pitch:” We’re limiting the number of pitches to three per person, so please pitch for the session(s) where you really feel you’ll offer SMX attendees your best.

You’ll be notified: Everyone who pitches to speak will be notified by email you are accepted or not.

And don’t delay—the pitch forms for each session will close as sessions are filled, with everything closing the week of February 18.

The post Want to speak at SMX London? Here’s how appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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How to avoid a site migration disaster /how-to-avoid-a-site-migration-disaster-310386 Fri, 11 Jan 2019 19:22:15 +0000 /?p=310386 There are many reasons you might be considering a site migration: introducing a new CMS, changing hosting providers or relaunching your templates and so on. But you need to be careful and proceed with caution, because many things can go wrong. And the consequences can be severe. At SMX West, Bastian Grimm, CEO & Director […]

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There are many reasons you might be considering a site migration: introducing a new CMS, changing hosting providers or relaunching your templates and so on. But you need to be careful and proceed with caution, because many things can go wrong. And the consequences can be severe.

At SMX West, Bastian Grimm, CEO & Director Organic Search at Peak Ace AG, and Patrick Stox Technical SEO Specialist for IBM, will be sharing their tips and best practices for executing a successful site migration. Both have performed dozens of successful migrations for a variety of sites around the world. They’ve also seen their share of things going wrong. I asked them to give a brief preview of what they’ll be discussing in their hour-long session at SMX West.

What are the most important things to consider when approaching a site migration?

Grimm: Personally, I believe that it generally comes down to two things: proper, well-in-advance forward planning and attention to detail when executing the migration. However, that’s certainly easier said than done. Last year we performed an overview and again, for botched migrations, the biggest problems either concerned redirects (yes, still!) or were somehow related to broken crawler control strategies (indexing directives, canonicalization issues).

Stox: Ask yourself if you need to make the changes at all. There are a lot of risks in making changes and the more you are doing the more chances there are for something to go wrong. The main considerations are scope and planning, which also includes checking over the migration. You’re going to have to consider brand, personnel, platform, costs, redirects, internal links, structure and much more. It can be a complex process and you really need to make sure the benefits outweigh the risks.

Are site migrations really technically complex, or is it just a matter of paying a lot of attention to detail and process (or both)?

Stox: It’s kind of both. If you understand the technical parts then it’s really attention to detail, but if you don’t understand the technical parts then something you’re not even aware of will probably go wrong.

Grimm: Both, really. Migrations become especially technically complex when a site reaches a certain URL inventory volume, say over 100k URLs. This usually means that there are many different (legacy) systems involved, you’re dealing with CDNs, etc. But on the flip side, we’ve migrated domains with only around 1,000 URLs in total. However, that specific company was almost exclusively ranking for short head keywords; if things went wrong, it’d be equally devastating for them. Generally speaking, a properly planned and executed process is certainly the key to success for any migration.

Over the past couple of years, we’ve seen a lot of site migrations due to moving to HTTPS. What other circumstances would prompt a migration?

Grimm: There’s a pretty broad variety of different migrations – the bigger problem is that the SEO industry doesn’t do well with restrictive definitions: it can be anything really, from hosting, software, domain and template migrations to content, design or even strategy migrations. Somehow, all of these factors influence SEO, some more – some less.

Here’s a slide from my presentation that summarizes various migration types.

Stox: Domain changes usually happen with re-branding or acquisitions. URL changes can happen with changes to your CMS or just general changes to your taxonomy or restructuring of a company.

Any good “war stories” of migrations going wrong? How did you fix things?

Stox: I have tons of these. Come to the session to hear about them. What you need to keep in mind is anything wrong is temporary. Luckily with these migrations, there’s almost nothing that can’t be fixed later, so don’t panic. It may hurt temporarily but it can be fixed.

Grimm: The worst case, no matter if you’re freelancing or part of an agency, is when you enter a scenario when things have already gone wrong. This doesn’t even necessarily mean that the migration has been completed, but often you’ll be confronted with a “the timeframe is set, we can’t change anything anymore” attitude which then results in rushing things through, and that’s never a good idea.

Technically, I feel there’s not a lot that we haven’t seen yet: from missing redirects, to loops, broken canonicals, missing disavow files (so penalties return) and entirely blocking crawlers, to more tricky issues (e.g. different header directives for different user-agents) and the whole complexity surrounding JavaScript frontend frameworks. In short, a lot can go wrong! That’s one of the reasons why I repeatedly suggest building test and review routines based on individual needs way in advance!

Apart from making sure the technical implementation goes smoothly, what kinds of business considerations come into play when doing a migration?

Grimm: First and foremost, probably a general risk vs. reward analysis (I’d recommend planning at least three different scenarios and comparing them individually against potential savings, e.g. legacy systems and infrastructure, as well as growth opportunities). Also, seasonality is important (e.g. when’s a good time to do it?) as well as results from previous user acceptance tests (e.g. if you’re introducing new layouts, etc.).

Stox: Usually branding, announcements, personnel changes, costs, contracts, timing, resources, content consolidation, possibly changes and migration/forwarding of emails, even things like social media accounts and phone numbers. I would say it’s almost impossible to think of everything the first time and there’s almost always something new that comes up unexpectedly.

This is just a taste of the actionable information gained from extensive experience that Bastian and Patrick will be presenting at SMX West. To hear more of their valuable insights (and download their slides as a key takeaway) be sure to attend our SMX West conference in San Jose January 30-31, 2019.

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SMX Munich agenda is now live /smx-munich-agenda-is-now-live-310354 Thu, 10 Jan 2019 22:19:50 +0000 /?p=310354 Our largest European show features amazing sessions like "The Four Horsemen of the Search Marketing Apocalypse" and many more.

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Search Engine Land’s SMX® Munich, the go-to event for search marketers in Europe, returns to Munich April 2-3 2019. The agenda, featuring more than 50 world-class speakers, teaches you actionable search marketing tactics you can implement immediately to drive more awareness, traffic and conversions. If you work in SEO, SEM, content marketing, social media or any other customer-facing activity, you can’t afford to miss it!

SMX Munich features six tracks of expert-led sessions in both German and English that cover:

  • Search marketing topics including search advertising (PPC/SEM), SEO, technical SEO, analytics and more.
  • Proven actionable tactics you can use immediately to improve your campaigns.
  • All experience levels, from beginner to advanced.

Speakers include Florian Eckert, Manager Digital McDonald’s Germany; Rand Fishkin, Founder of SparkToro; John Müller, Webmaster Trends Analyst for Google; Purna Virji, Senior Engagement Manager, Microsoft; Luis Navarrete Gómez, Head of Global Search Marketing for Lego, and dozens more.

Want to know more? Check out the SMX Munich agenda today!

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Machine vs. man: What really matters for SEO success /machine-vs-man-what-really-matters-for-seo-success-310169 Tue, 08 Jan 2019 20:51:07 +0000 /?p=310169 Changes to the core concepts of quality and authority over the past year have altered the course of SEO forever, with Google both improving algorithms and increasingly relying on human "quality raters."

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Old methods of dynamically generating content and other quick hacks no longer result in long-term, sustainable SEO performance.

Gone are the days of low-quality ghostwriting as a means of rapidly producing new blog articles for the sake of “content freshness.” Additionally, SEOs can no longer rely upon re-purposing information otherwise found online (especially without citing one’s sources) as an effective and sustainable content strategy.

To succeed in this new landscape, SEOs must learn how Google has changed the rules regarding content quality and authority and what steps website owners must take to ensure they’re seen as trustworthy.

Lily Ray, Director of SEO, Path Interactive

Lily Ray, Director of SEO, Path Interactive

As Director of SEO for Path Interactive, Lily Ray has spent months studying the changes and understanding the impacts the updates around authority have had on client sites. She’ll be sharing her insights, as well as offering tips for surviving and thriving in this new era of search quality at SMX West in San Jose on January 30th.

I asked Lily to describe what you should focus on and what really matters for SEO success in today’s algorithmically-driven yet human-mediated ranking environment.

What are the biggest changes in how sites are evaluated and ranked that you’ve seen over the past year?

2018 was the year when Google turned up the dial on analyzing the quality and trustworthiness of web pages and domains. In previous years, making small tweaks to well-known ranking factors (such as adjusting title tags or adding new internal links) could have been enough to see an improvement in SEO performance, even if the website wasn’t known as an authority on the subject being written about.

Those types of quick on-page optimization tactics are no longer sufficient to obtain top positions in the search results, especially if the website contains other issues related to quality and trust. Google is now honing in on the reputation and credibility of both the website itself, as well as the creators who contribute to its content. It has also placed great importance on user experience, such as by rolling out several updates related to page speed and switching to mobile-first indexing.

What steps do you take when one of your clients has had a huge traffic drop due to an algorithm change?

We start by looking at both on- and off-site issues related to quality and trust when a client has been hit. We analyze which pages were hit or whether the effect was site-wide, to see if a certain section of the site contains E-A-T (expertise, authoritativeness, trustworthiness) issues or if the entire domain’s authority was called into question. We take a close look at the content on affected pages compared to that of our competitors. Does it adequately answer the search query with the appropriate vocabulary, citations and page structure?

Doing a “site:” search is another step we take when gauging the current organic footprint of a site; it’s common to find many thin, duplicate, or low-quality pages in the index that could benefit from being merged or removed. Another good tactic (which is actually suggested by Google) is to look up reviews of the content creator or the website itself, while excluding results pulled from the website in question. There may be external issues related to the client’s trustworthiness that need to be resolved.

How closely should people be following the Google Search Quality Evaluator Guidelines?

Our SEO team has a printed-out copy of the 2018 Search Quality Rater Guidelines on our bookshelf, which we often dive into when analyzing an affected site or whenever else we have questions about how Google defines “high quality” content. While we are fully aware that Google has stated that many of the recommendations in the guidelines are not current ranking factors, we know these are good long-term marketing strategies that Google teams will work to build into future evolutions of the search algorithm.

Furthermore, we have already seen ample evidence in recent months that the algorithm has made great improvements in learning how to behave like a human being when analyzing website quality. And although it may be obvious to most SEOs by now, the updated guidelines clearly state that old-fashioned SEO techniques like keyword stuffing, auto-generating content or writing low-quality blog articles for the sake of churning out new content are not sustainable strategies to produce good results in the future.

How much impact are artificial intelligence and machine learning having on ranking algorithms?

I think a lot of what we have seen in recent months with algorithm updates stems from Google’s rapid advancements in machine learning. When Ben Gomes of Google said the rater guidelines are “where we want the search algorithm to go,” he confirmed that humans continue to be the best judge of what is high-quality and what is not (for now at least), but there is still work to do for the algorithms to catch up with human judgment.

Machine learning makes that process much quicker and more scalable than it has ever been before. But when we see major fluctuations in search, as we have in the past six months with sites drastically rising and falling after each algorithm update, it’s a good indication that sometimes the algorithms can miss the mark and still have a lot of work to do.

What kind of changes are you anticipating for the coming year?

By focusing so much on the reputation of the website and the creators of the content — especially for YMYL (Your Money Or Your Life) sites — Google has made it hard to rank well with mediocre content or lack of expertise. Ranking in 2019 will require more time and effort than ever before, because short-term hacks won’t lead to sustained SEO success.

I believe that companies and individuals who are focused on their search presence should keep a close eye on their online reputations and take steps to address anything that may bring their credibility or trustworthiness into question. This includes actually listening to their customers and addressing their concerns across different platforms. It includes not overwhelming customers with calls to action or advertisements. It also includes providing easy ways for customers to get in touch with them when customers have a problem and incorporating that feedback into how they operate their business.

These are not easy things to achieve; digital brands must be all-hands-on-deck to build and maintain long-term organic visibility. But these are also the things human searchers evaluate as they make informed consumer decisions, and search engines are quickly catching up to humans in their ability to emulate those evaluation processes.

Want more insights and practical tips about dealing with algorithm changes from Lily and other experts in the field? Be sure to attend our SMX West conference in San Jose January 30-31, 2019.

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Wanted: Session ideas for SMX Advanced /wanted-session-ideas-for-smx-advanced-309689 Thu, 20 Dec 2018 18:31:50 +0000 /?p=309689 We’d love to hear from you if you have a great idea for a session that you think should be on the agenda. And if you’re interested in speaking at the show, the absolute best way to improve your chances of being chosen is to get involved at this point, by suggesting an awesome idea […]

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We’d love to hear from you if you have a great idea for a session that you think should be on the agenda. And if you’re interested in speaking at the show, the absolute best way to improve your chances of being chosen is to get involved at this point, by suggesting an awesome idea that really catches our attention.

We’re looking for two types of suggestions:

Session ideas for regular SMX sessions. Most sessions at SMX conferences are 60-90 minutes in length, and feature 2 to 3 speakers. Here, we’re not looking for solo presentations; rather, your idea should be a topic where multiple speakers can each weigh in with their own point of view, opinion and suggested tactics. You can let us know if you’re interested in speaking or would just like to see the session idea considered without nominating yourself to speak.

Session ideas for solo presentations. Solo presentations are keynote level, TED-style presentations from industry visionaries. We’re looking for the best of the best: seasoned professionals, acknowledged thought leaders, inspiring communicators. People who will wow attendees with their insights and motivate them to chart new territory in their own online marketing campaigns. If you pitch to speak on a solo session, you really need to wow us to be seriously considered. Solo sessions are typically 22 minutes long.

Key Milestones For SMX Advanced – Mark Your Calendar!

  • Session ideas accepted: Through Tuesday, Jan. 9
  • Agenda posted: February
  • Speaking pitches accepted after agenda posting through March 1

Have a suggestion? Please read our guidelines for speaking at SMX conferences, use the session idea suggestion form to describe your idea.

Don’t delay! The session idea suggestion form closes Tuesday, Jan. 9.

Chris Sherman
Chair, SMX Advanced

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See the future of search at SMX West /see-the-future-of-search-at-smx-west-309680 Thu, 20 Dec 2018 17:50:55 +0000 /?p=309680 On Wednesday, January 30, Google Head of North America Global Partnerships Marco Lenoci will take you on a journey where search is evolving from people actively seeking information, products and services, to the “Age of Assistance” where smart internet connected devices will anticipate our needs and will be constantly on hand as personal concierges. You’ll […]

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On Wednesday, January 30, Google Head of North America Global Partnerships Marco Lenoci will take you on a journey where search is evolving from people actively seeking information, products and services, to the “Age of Assistance” where smart internet connected devices will anticipate our needs and will be constantly on hand as personal concierges. You’ll get a glimpse of Google’s five year plan and gain meaningful insights into some crucial anticipated seismic shifts in marketing.

Then on Thursday, January 31 Microsoft Search Evangelist Christi Olson and Junaid Ahmed, Partner Group Engineering Manager for Microsoft Bing will lay out Microsoft’s vision for “The Quest For Intelligent Search.” You’ll hear about how AI is becoming a key driving force both in natural search and ads, and how as marketers you must anticipate and prepare for the inexorable move from keywords towards intent and audiences.

As the song says, the future of search marketing is going to be bright. In addition to visionary keynotes you’ll experience cutting-edge sessions with presentations from some of the most respected experts and thought leaders in the industry. It’s an experience you won’t want to miss.

Early bird rates expire this Saturday, December 21, so don’t relay – register now to secure your spot at this must-attend event for search marketers.

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Can JavaScript override a nofollow meta tag? /can-javascript-override-a-nofollow-meta-tag-309570 Mon, 17 Dec 2018 22:50:32 +0000 /?p=309570 Suppose you find yourself in a situation where you want Google to index certain pages, but you are required to use a template that uses the “nofollow” robots.txt meta tag. Can you use JavaScript to remove the tag when the page is fully rendered so that Google will index it? This question was recently posted […]

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Suppose you find yourself in a situation where you want Google to index certain pages, but you are required to use a template that uses the “nofollow” robots.txt meta tag. Can you use JavaScript to remove the tag when the page is fully rendered so that Google will index it?

This question was recently posted in the TechSEO subreddit. John Mueller, Google Senior Webmaster Trends Analyst, responded that Google will use the most restrictive setting you have on the page, regardless of how it’s included.

Using the “noindex” tag is just about the most restrictive condition you can apply to a page — you are literally telling Google to ignore the page. If a page has a “noindex” in static HTML, and JavaScript is used to remove it when the page is rendered, Google will still see the “noindex” and comply with the request.

“Noindex” overrides other robots.txt meta tags as well. For example, if you have a “noindex” + “index”, then the “noindex” will override the “index.” Moreover, if a page doesn’t even have any meta tags, and for some reason you use JavaScript to add a “noindex” tag, Google will honor the “noindex” request.

The bottom line: JavaScript can be a very powerful workaround for many limitations or requirements, but in the case of “noindex” it simply won’t work to cancel out the impact of a noindex meta tag embedded in a template.

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m88 asia

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